David Foster Wallace Portrait

David Foster Wallace Portrait

  • acrylic on archival drawing paper, 2011
  • signed on reverse (will sign on front at your request)
  • 11″ x 14″, unframed
  • artwork ships in a protective sleeve and is flat-packed by hand to prevent folding and curling

I made this portrait of David Foster Wallace by looking at a variety of reference images and then creating a composite likeness from all of those sources. I make each portrait by hand, using my four-color stencil process, separating the image into a series of eight stencils then airbrushing each color from light to dark.

Have you ever loved something that makes people’s eyes roll if they learn that you love it? That describes my love for Infinite Jest, my favorite book. When you love Infinite Jest you risk being identified as someone who is ostentatious about how literary they are or as a torch-bearer for continued white male domination.

The fact is, I just love this book. It is so human, absurd, compassionate, unflinching and told in a voice that genuinely wants to achieve full communication without ambiguity. All in a story where major plot points happen (or don’t happen) off camera.

I actually made this portrait not long after DFW’s death and a good ten years before I read his most well-known novel. I set him in darkness, like a Rembrandt portrait, and now that I’ve read more of his work I feel that this portrait works as a snapshot of who he was, to the degree that I could possibly know that.

Fuzz Dots

Fuzz Dots

  • acrylic on archival watercolor paper, 2011
  • signed on front and reverse
  • 11″ x 14″, unframed
  • artwork ships in a protective sleeve and is flat-packed by hand to prevent folding and curling

Dot paintings have a rich history, which is both funny and amazing because dots seem too simple to tolerate so many artists working with them. Yayoi Kusama and Damian Hirst are the top dot-painting-makers that come to mind, and I must say that I really like both of their approaches. Kusama’s dots are meditative and biomorphic, whereas Hirst’s dots are more systematic and suggest taxonomies. But it is all beautiful.

My Fuzz Dots lean more toward the Hirst approach because they are on a grid (though slanted) and on a white background. On the other hand, Fuzz Dots are blurred from the sprayed acrylic, so they feel less rigid and suggest atmosphere, space, softness.

Every Fuzz Dots painting is unique, so browse your options and see which one you connect with. They are nice simply as background decor, but having lived with them I can tell you that looking at them can induce a serene feeling, as if your eyes are taking deep, calming breaths.

Into Your Depth

Into Your Depth

  • acrylic on archival watercolor paper, 2011
  • signed on front and reverse, edition of 5
  • 11″ x 14″, unframed
  • artwork ships in a protective sleeve and is flat-packed by hand to prevent folding and curling

In 2011 I was working with stencils that I made from brushstrokes of oil paint that I scanned and separated. Into Your Depth is one of the few pieces composed out of those brushstroke stencils with a background, creating a classic figure/ground relationship. And once you have a foreground and a background, it’s like looking up at clouds and creating characters and stories.

Into Your Depth is kind of a sentimental title that emerged from the movement of the strokes, which seem to be both rising upward into the white and plunging down into the increasingly layered, oceanic blue at the bottom.

This edition of 5 airbrushed stencil paintings is more than half gone, so add one to your collection and enjoy the atmosphere and poetry of those rising and plunging brushstrokes.

JK Rowling Portrait

JK Rowling Portrait

  • acrylic on archival watercolor paper, 2011
  • signed on reverse (will sign on front at your request)
  • 11″ x 14″, unframed
  • artwork ships in a protective sleeve and is flat-packed by hand to prevent folding and curling

I made this portrait of JK Rowling by looking at a variety of reference images and then creating a composite likeness from all of those sources. I make each portrait by hand, using my four-color stencil process, separating the image into a series of eight stencils then airbrushing each color from light to dark.

I have read the Harry Potter series twice on my own, listened to the Jim Dale audiobooks at least twice and read the series aloud to each of my kids, so her work has meant a lot to me over the past twenty years.

Just Strokes, Series 3

Just Strokes, Series 3 Paintings

  • 5 original drawings in the series
  • acrylic on archival drawing paper, 2011
  • signed on front and reverse
  • 11″ x 14″, unframed
  • artwork ships in a protective sleeve and is flat-packed by hand to prevent folding and curling

More adventures in stenciled abstract expressionism! It occurs to me only just now, ten years later, that these five paintings of layered, brightly-colors gestural brushstrokes are in the tradition of Ingrid Calame, whose painting I loved in the late 90s and early 00s.

Where Ingrid would find her drips and splatters in parking lots and other day-to-day environments, I made all my strokes in the studio. So I guess you could call me the novelist to Ingrid’s documentarian?

Also, in contrast to Ingrid’s work — I’m writing way more about Ingrid than I thought I was going to be — each of these paintings is a discreet composition on a clean, white background, as opposed to a field of color and splat. Again, I love those Ingrid Calame pieces: I’m just making distinctions here.

So, if you’ve ever experienced sticker shock when you told the gallery clerk, “I’d like the Ingrid Calame,” these pieces are for you!

Little Marcel Proust Portrait

Little Marcel Proust Portrait

  • acrylic on archival watercolor paper, 2011
  • signed on reverse (will sign on front at your request)
  • 11″ x 14″, unframed
  • artwork ships in a protective sleeve and is flat-packed by hand to prevent folding and curling

I made this portrait of Marcel Proust as a boy by looking at a variety of reference images and then creating a composite likeness from all of those sources. I make each portrait by hand, using my four-color stencil process, separating the image into a series of eight stencils then airbrushing each color from light to dark.

À la recherche du temps perdu is the one great literary epic that I’ve made it through. When I began it in my early 20s, the translation I was reading was called Remebrance of Things Past, which sounds pretty sentimental compared to In Search of Lost Time, which is the translation I picked up in my early 30s and spent at least a year reading.

So, for this artwork, I went in search of little boy Marcel as we read about him in the early parts of the story, when he spends a lot of time alone or with Francoise and begins his obsession with the Duchesse de Guermantes.